Lawn Care and Fertilization Questions And Answers

  1.  Is it a good idea to apply grass and fertilizer immediately after mowing the lawn?
  2. Fresh cut grass does not matter. It is more important to space meals about eight weeks apart.
  3. I am a city girl who just moved to the country and I don’t know how to maintain my lawn. I have a feeling I should be fertilizing my lawn, but what exactly does that mean and when do I do it? I have bare patches around the edges and areas of thinning in the middle. Do I leave grass seeds? How often should I water? Right now my biggest issue is bare patches of grass. I have weeds, but I think I have them under control with a monthly herbicide. I really need a game plan to start controlling this turf.
  4. Cut the grass to the right amount for its type. Do not cut more than a third of the blade at a time. Keep the lawn watered, ideally one inch of water per week, including any rain that falls. Feed the herb periodically, approximately every eight weeks. Remove weeds and seeds from bare places. That can take a long time if the areas involved are large. The seed needs to be watered daily for 14 days or more in order to germinate. A healthy lawn will tend to keep weeds on its own. The goal should be a healthy lawn.
  5. I have brown spots everywhere. I’ve been reading that really the only thing you can do is wait and water. However, I read somewhere that you can tear dead grass with a metal rake and re-sow. What is the best? Should I keep watering and waiting?
  6. Sounds like you’re trying to spread the fertilizer by hand. Chemical fertilizers can be difficult to spread properly even with a good spreader if you don’t know what you are doing. With a chemical fertilizer, use a diffusion spreader and overlap, making sure that the product “toss” is from wheel to wheel. It is important to err on the side of a lack of fertilizer than too much. You’ve seen what the “too much” side does. This way you get full coverage without “streaks” or burnt spots. You should be able to rake the dead grass and seed it. Much will depend on how much fertilizer was applied, whether liquid or granular, your soil type, and where you live.

You may not realize that there is a safe and easy alternative to chemical fertilizers that still achieves outstanding results. An organic lawn fertilizer, like Ringers Lawn Restore that you find at home improvement centers, is more difficult to misapply and works great. Soil bugs must break down organic fertilizer before plants can use the nutrients; release is slow and controlled, and the way a plant likes it. Chemical fertilizers claim “slow release” but are still very powerful. With proper mowing, watering, and organic fertilization, in two to three seasons, your lawn will thrive, choke weeds, and create envious neighbors.

There is an application where a chemical fertilizer works better than an organic one. In a cold season or ‘northern’ lawn, lawn studies have shown that the nitrogen in the fertilizer at the end of the season allows the lawn to build up significant carbohydrate stores after the top growth has stopped and until the soil has settled. freeze.

Q.How long do I wait until I mow the re-seeded grass? I used Scott’s seed and the only information I could find on the bag was about germination which took four to six weeks before fertilizing and not using the herbicide for three mowings. There is no note of when I can cut the first time.

  1. Usually wait until the grass is 3-5 inches tall, place the mower up high with a sharp blade and cut the grass.
  2. My husband and I recently purchased a half-acre home. We live in the Raleigh area of ​​North Carolina. The grass is not bad here, but I would like it to be as thick and green as possible. It has a lot of clovers and some weeds. I’d like to get rid of them, and just have thick, rich green grass. My question is, what do I need to do to make my lawn look good, and what do we need to do, and when, throughout the year, to keep it looking great?
  3. If there is no grass, you will need something. If you have grass, you can encourage it and discourage weeds. To install a new patio, kill the old one and plant the new seed, twig, or grass. To improve what you have, find out what kind of weed it is. Then get into the practice of cutting it down to the proper height to remove no more than a third of the blade at a time, covering clippings, keeping it watered, feeding on time, and working to get rid of weeds. Healthy, thick grass is its own weed deterrent. Fall can be a good time to start a garden, because the demand for water is lower, weeds are generally not actively growing, and the next winter will allow the lawn to develop roots while the leaves are dormant. However, grass needs enough time to establish itself before frost. Check with your local county extension service for advice on this time. Otherwise, start the new lawn in the spring. The extension service can tell you when in the spring.

In general, keep the yard watered in winter in periods of prolonged drought. The grass is still alive in winter and can die if allowed to dry out. Spring is the time to plan and execute central aeration of existing lawns, feeding and applying pre-emergent herbicides to avoid crabgrass, among other weeds, and a tune-up on your mower. Once the grass is on top, begin the cutting regimen. Keep trimming for the benefit of the lawn. Scott has a website that has an email service to remind him when to do certain things on his lawn. In summer, cut back and treat insect problems as they occur. Fall is the time for the last feeding and winter preparation of the grass. If you put a new patio, there is sowing, branching, plugging and turf. The cost increases from seed to grass. The amount of time for a nice yard decreases from seed to grass. The key here is money. For any patio, a soil test is essential to know what modifications the soil needs. For a new patio, remove the old one, correct the soil and until it is about 4 inches, level, then: sow at the proper rate, keep it watered daily for about 14 days for the seed to germinate, when the grass is about 3 -5 inches tall, cut for the first time. Over time, the grass will thicken and form a nice lawn. New grass is tender and will not respond well to foot traffic until it is mature and thick. Sprouting and plugging are intermediate ways to install real grass to lightly cover the area and wait for the fill that will occur over time. Of course, the lawn means that you lay your patio, roll it up for contact with the ground, water, and enjoy. No need to wait. The key here is money. For any patio, a soil test is essential to know what modifications the soil needs. For a new patio, remove the old one, correct the soil and until it is about 4 inches, level, then: sow at the proper rate, keep it watered daily for about 14 days for the seed to germinate, when the grass is about 3 -5 inches tall, cut for the first time. Over time, the grass will thicken and form a nice lawn. New grass is tender and will not respond well to foot traffic until it is mature and thick. Sprouting and plugging are intermediate ways to install real grass to lightly cover the area and wait for the fill that will occur over time. Of course, the lawn means that you lay your patio, roll it up for contact with the ground, water, and enjoy. No need to wait. The key here is money. For any patio, a soil test is essential to know what modifications the soil needs. For a new patio, remove the old one, correct the soil and until it is about 4 inches, level, then: sow at the proper rate, keep it watered daily for about 14 days for the seed to germinate, when the grass is about 3 -5 inches tall, cut for the first time. Over time, the grass will thicken and form a nice lawn. New grass is tender and will not respond well to foot traffic until it is mature and thick. Sprouting and plugging are intermediate ways to install real grass to lightly cover the area and wait for the fill that will occur over time. Of course, the lawn means that you lay your patio, roll it up for contact with the ground, water, and enjoy. No need to wait. A soil test is essential to know what modifications the soil needs. For a new patio, remove the old one, correct the soil and until it is about 4 inches, level, then: sow at the proper rate, keep it watered daily for about 14 days for the seed to germinate, when the grass is about 3 -5 inches tall, cut for the first time. Over time, the grass will thicken and form a nice lawn. New grass is tender and will not respond well to foot traffic until it is mature and thick. Sprouting and plugging are intermediate ways to install real grass to lightly cover the area and wait for the fill that will occur over time. Of course, the lawn means that you lay your patio, roll it up for contact with the ground, water, and enjoy. No need to wait. A soil test is essential to know what modifications the soil needs. For a new patio, remove the old one, correct the soil and until it is about 4 inches, level, then: sow at the proper rate, keep it watered daily for about 14 days for the seed to germinate, when the grass is about 3 -5 inches tall, cut for the first time. Over time, the grass will thicken and form a nice lawn. New grass is tender and will not respond well to foot traffic until it is mature and thick. Sprouting and plugging are intermediate ways to install real grass to lightly cover the area and wait for the fill that will occur over time. Of course, the lawn means that you lay your patio, roll it up for contact with the ground, water, and enjoy. No need to wait. seeds at proper rate, keep watered daily for about 14 days for seed to germinate, when grass is about 3-5 inches tall first cut. Over time, the grass will thicken and form a nice lawn. New grass is tender and will not respond well to foot traffic until it is mature and thick. Sprouting and plugging are intermediate ways to install real grass to lightly cover the area and wait for the fill that will occur over time. Of course, the lawn means that you lay your patio, roll it up for contact with the ground, water, and enjoy. No need to wait. seeds at proper rate, keep watered daily for about 14 days for seed to germinate, when grass is about 3-5 inches tall first cut. Over time, the grass will thicken and form a nice lawn. New grass is tender and will not respond well to foot traffic until it is mature and thick. Sprouting and plugging are intermediate ways to install real grass to lightly cover the area and wait for the fill that will occur over time. Of course, the lawn means that you put your patio, Roll it up for contact with the ground, water and enjoy. No need to wait. New grass is tender and will not respond well to foot traffic until it is mature and thick. Sprouting and plugging are intermediate ways to install real grass to lightly cover the area and wait for the fill that will occur over time. Of course, the lawn means that you lay your patio, roll it up for contact with the ground, water, and enjoy. No need to wait. New grass is tender and will not respond well to foot traffic until it is mature and thick. Sprouting and plugging are intermediate ways to install real grass to lightly cover the area and wait for the fill that will occur over time. Of course, the lawn means that you lay your patio, roll it up for contact with the ground, water, and enjoy. No need to wait.

  1. My newly installed lawn seems to be dying, both from being too dry around the perimeter and from being too wet in the center. I installed it about a month ago in an area where we had previously removed an in-ground pool. The turf was installed in a 4 ″ layer of good topsoil. The pool demonstration company filled the pool area with a supposedly clean fill. The lawn area is also surrounded by a 4 ‘retaining wall on two sides. Our native soil in the area is very sandy so I was surprised to see that the water did not run off during irrigation or rains for long periods, mainly where the pool had been filled. Watering the new lawn has been very difficult. I suspect that the quality of the filler may have been marginal (mainly clay). It’s too late to change that, but what can I do to save my lawn?
  2. The combination of grass and topsoil over the fill may have created a hardpan-like layer. Water will not pass through this layer. If you could punch holes through this layer, the problem could be solved. As deep as it appears to be, I suspect a center vent that cuts 3 inches deep will be inadequate. Perhaps, you could use a digging rod or other solid metal rod to drill holes to allow water to seep through the soil. Alternatively, the grass seems to have not gotten that far. You can lift the grass in the problem area and until the soil drops 6 inches or so to mix the top layer of soil with the next layer. Then check if the water drains properly. If so, replace the lawn and tend it.

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